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Thread: Veg Plot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Your nightmares!
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    3,380

    Default Veg Plot

    Who on here grows veg in Caithness? In the exposed regions!

    I have an area all fenced off and ready to start planning and digging veg beds but I've never had a veg plot before and don't know where to start.
    I have the books but they aren't relevant to such exposed coastal sites as this.

    Generallt what grows well up here? When do I sow em? Do I need to sow indoors and transplant later? What about protection?

    I'd like to grow spuds - for all year -, leeks, carrots, courgettes, sweetcorn if possible (or is that expecting too much?)

    Is crop rotation best?
    I can get hold of plenty of manure.
    Are raised beds best?
    Is it a good idea to use seaweed either as a mulch or as a liquid fertiliser?


    Sorry, I'm a complete novice at this and my friend and I really want to get started on these all ready for next year.
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.

    http://thetenaciousgardener.blogspot.co.uk/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Between heaven and hell..
    Posts
    2,637

    Default

    http://www.selfsufficientish.com/potatoes.htm#harvestYou could try this link. I used it before i got my veg patch going. I am now just pulling up my tatties and planted my late for christmas. I also have cauli, broccoli, beetroot, sweetcorn,leeks,onions and the likes growing. It should help if you are just beggining,,,,,,
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/grow_...rotation.shtml


    Let me know if this any good for you...
    Last edited by justine; 09-Aug-07 at 21:43.

  3. #3

    Default

    We grow veg up at groats and am very exposed. Wind and lack of sun has been a pain this year. We have planted a potential hedgerow round my spot, but that is for future years. So far we have had success with:


    Peas
    Cauliflower
    Kohl Rabi
    Onions
    Challots
    Cabbage
    Spinach
    Carrots
    Spuds
    Sprouts
    Leaks


    All but the onions and challots were brought on in the greenhouse


    Fruit that is successful (so far) here:


    Black currents
    Gooseberries
    Raspberries
    Tayberries


    In the green house (which has suffered a load of wind damage) we have:


    A grape vine (no fruit yet)
    Courgette
    Tomatoes (We have even have some growing outside in wind breaks that have fruit coming but I doubt they will get far)
    Peppers
    Chillies
    Garlic
    and various herbs.


    Rotation and feeding are extremely good. Deep beds are very,very good. Dig seaweed in with your winter manure and it can rot in the ground giving off all it's oceanic goodness. Seaweed and nettles and can also be left to soak in water to produce a good feed.



    I am pleasantly surprised Justine has had success with sweetcorn, I shall have to try.



    Hope this helps.
    They break our legs and we say "thank you" when they offer us crutches!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Out of Caithness... sadly
    Posts
    2,772

    Default

    Excellent results, Statman. Has anyone tried growing soy beans? The 'beans' inside are the brightest of greens and make a very tasty and nutritious vegetable addition to the table. The popular name for them is edamame beans; Birdseye are marketing them at the moment.
    "Step sideways, pause and study those around you. You will learn a great deal."

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ricco View Post
    Excellent results, Statman. Has anyone tried growing soy beans? The 'beans' inside are the brightest of greens and make a very tasty and nutritious vegetable addition to the table. The popular name for them is edamame beans; Birdseye are marketing them at the moment.
    Sounds interesting Ricco. I shall have to look in to it. I tend to think of most exotic beans as for warmer climates,
    They break our legs and we say "thank you" when they offer us crutches!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Between heaven and hell..
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stratman View Post
    We grow veg up at groats and am very exposed. Wind and lack of sun has been a pain this year. We have planted a potential hedgerow round my spot, but that is for future years. So far we have had success with:


    Peas
    Cauliflower
    Kohl Rabi
    Onions
    Challots
    Cabbage
    Spinach
    Carrots
    Spuds
    Sprouts
    Leaks


    All but the onions and challots were brought on in the greenhouse


    Fruit that is successful (so far) here:


    Black currents
    Gooseberries
    Raspberries
    Tayberries


    In the green house (which has suffered a load of wind damage) we have:


    A grape vine (no fruit yet)
    Courgette
    Tomatoes (We have even have some growing outside in wind breaks that have fruit coming but I doubt they will get far)
    Peppers
    Chillies
    Garlic
    and various herbs.


    Rotation and feeding are extremely good. Deep beds are very,very good. Dig seaweed in with your winter manure and it can rot in the ground giving off all it's oceanic goodness. Seaweed and nettles and can also be left to soak in water to produce a good feed.



    I am pleasantly surprised Justine has had success with sweetcorn, I shall have to try.



    Hope this helps.

    Hey stratman. the knack for the sweetcorn is to bring it on in the house in a well lit warm room. I found the kitchen window perfect.Spray daily with warm water.Keep them in there for the first 4-6 months of the year, and then put out in june.The heat should bring them up...When you first put them out like any other young shoot cover with a small polly tunnel and then just leave and let grow.....If you have any tips for watermelon i would appreciate it as i could not get mine going this year.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    broadhaven road
    Posts
    938

    Default

    had our first sweetcorn for dinner tonight but it was grown in a greenhouse
    brocolli is now ready as well

  8. #8

    Default

    Have grown this year on a coastal site:

    Cabbage
    Cauliflower
    Broccoli
    Carrots (long type and golf ball)
    lettuce
    onions
    peas
    leeks
    french beans (not very good)
    parsnips
    garlic
    tomatoes (in a lean to greenhouse)
    Strawberries
    raspberries
    black and red currants
    gooseberries
    blueberries

    Catapillers have been at my caulis, broccoli and cabbage, seem to be loads about for some reason
    Last edited by neepnipper; 19-Aug-07 at 21:45. Reason: spelling

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    broadhaven road
    Posts
    938

    Default

    also suffer caterpillers but also grow ornamental cabbages so just get the kids to relocate the beasties

  10. #10

    Default

    Forgot:
    Potaoes
    courgettes

    also herbs:
    mint
    thyme
    parsley
    chives
    marjoram

    all seem to do really well.

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