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Thread: subsequently

  1. #1

    Default subsequently

    HA just came cross this https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=subsequently google knows you know.
    AAR

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alien Adrenaline Reflex View Post
    HA just came cross this https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=subsequently google knows you know.
    Yeah ? Given constant debacles by SNP whose only recourse is blame,,( westminster ) and consistent failures, I cant see the many scots who voted for the union changing their minds so slep easy

  3. #3
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    This has been the definition since before the referendum. It refers to the Act of Union in 1707.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by squidge View Post
    This has been the definition since before the referendum. It refers to the Act of Union in 1707.
    Does it indeed, look up the meaning in any standard dictionary..act of union......indeed....

  5. #5
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    Ok... A bit of background - this has come to light because there is a campaign going on at the moment because this is the definition of subsequently in the OED. The campaigners say that the "SNP" is infiltrating great institutions like the OED and THEY ARE NOT HAVING IT.

    This definition in the OED has however, been like this for several years - even before the referendum and it refers to the Act of Union in 1707. It's nothing to do with some imagined infiltration.

  6. #6
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    I honestly thought it was a wind-up but it does actually say;"many of the Scots who voted for Union subsequently changed their minds" Ben trying to find ref to Act of Union, can anyone help?
    "Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bekisman View Post
    I honestly thought it was a wind-up but it does actually say;"many of the Scots who voted for Union subsequently changed their minds" Ben trying to find ref to Act of Union, can anyone help?
    You can find the official version of the background here. http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/evolutionofparliament/legislativescrutiny/act-of-union-1707/

    And the articles here http://www.parliament.uk/documents/h...lesofunion.pdf

    According to channel4learning.com for Secondary schools

    After much argument, the Scots received 16 seats in the Westminster House of Lords and 45 seats in the House of Commons. This compared with 196 English lords and 513 English MPs.

    Within months, even some of the nobles who had voted for the Union began to regret it. The Scottish Privy Council was abolished by London in October 1707. The nobles suddenly realised that they had lost an important source of jobs and influence. New laws such as the Treason Act of 1708 were based on English law and therefore a breach of the Treaty. That very year, the Court of Session in Edinburgh was overruled by the House of Lords in Westminster, technically another breach of the Treaty. Scottish nobles were also barred from the Lords if they tried to use their Scottish titles to gain a seat there.

    Several other new laws outraged the Presbyterians in the official Church of Scotland. People were now allowed to worship in the English Episcopalian way. Local landowners were given the power to choose parish ministers. This went against the Presbyterian tradition of congregations selecting their own minister.

    The Scots were also disappointed by the financial side of the Union. The Equivalent was mostly paid in paper money, not in the gold coin which the Scots expected. Scotland's east coast burghs could no longer trade with France and suffered terribly. English customs officials arrived in Scotland to collect the new higher taxes and customs. Then in 1713 the London government put taxes on goods which were exempt according to the Union and which were crucial to the Scottish economy. That year the Scottish nobles tried to repeal the Union. They only failed by four votes.

    Even supporters of the Union such as the influential Earl of Mar, felt that it had failed. The deep resentment at the Union led many Scots, especially Highlanders, to support the Jacobite cause of the Catholic Stuarts. Jacobite armies tried to invade Britain in 1708 and 1719. There were serious Jacobite rebellions in 1715 and 1745. Eventually these were suppressed by the British Army and the Highlands of Scotland were pacified.

    At some stage, the Speaker of the House of Commons said “We have catch’d Scotland and will bind her fast.” but it is unclear whether that was at the time of the passing of the Acts of Union in 1707....or on the announcing of the result of the close vote in 1713. It does, however, appear, given the disparity in representation, that a large proportion of the English MPs also voted for Scotland to remove itself from the Union.

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    Never let it be said that the Nattieboys hold a grudge for any length of time!

  9. #9
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    Thanks for that Oddquine, I did not know it was the Scots who were pushing for a Union of England and Scotland:
    “the Convention appointed commissioners to negotiate with the English but met with a wall of disinterest. A proposal for union [by Scotland] was made in the Lords in 1695, but that, too, received short shrift. In Scotland, however, the case for union found much favour among the political elite during the 1690s, mainly because of the poor state of the economy. In 1699, there were discussions between politicians in London and Edinburgh and the English side acknowledged that a union might be in both nations' interest. The Scots hoped for a union of trade with vital access to English colonial markets…”


    Well there you are.. you learn something new every day!
    "Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped."

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