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Thread: Track ID please, I'm bafffled.

  1. #1
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    Default Track ID please, I'm bafffled.





    Spotted these out on Dunnet Head today, about the size of a medium cat print,they ran for about 1/4 mile coming from heathland ,along the road, stopped at a puddle and then disappeared into an area of grass.From the long thin marks behind the pug marks, must be something low to the ground with a tail but no obvious claws marks.

  2. #2
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    Default Errr

    With all the snow, could it be a Yeti (mini Highland version)?? lol

  3. #3
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    No idea Lizz, but hope someone comes up with the answer.

    Stoat or a Weasel??? (thinking small, with tail)
    Away with the birds

  4. #4
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    That was my initial reaction, stoat but all the pics I have looked at of their tracks show definite claw indents.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by LIZZ View Post




    Spotted these out on Dunnet Head today, about the size of a medium cat print,they ran for about 1/4 mile coming from heathland ,along the road, stopped at a puddle and then disappeared into an area of grass.From the long thin marks behind the pug marks, must be something low to the ground with a tail but no obvious claws marks.
    Possibly a cat (domestic, probably too small for a wildcat) stalking potential prey - walking low to ground, tip of tail touching snow?? The absence of claws (sheathed when walking) and what appears to be four toes suggest feline...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haweswater View Post
    Possibly a cat (domestic, probably too small for a wildcat) stalking potential prey - walking low to ground, tip of tail touching snow?? The absence of claws (sheathed when walking) and what appears to be four toes suggest feline...
    Wild Haggis in winter plumage (no, a cat really).

  7. #7
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    Any chance its an otter?
    "Step sideways, pause and study those around you. You will learn a great deal."

  8. #8
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    Default I Know

    IT'S A HAGGIS, OUT FOR A RUN IN THE SNOW.......

  9. #9
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    Now which breed o' haggis would it be?
    I thought the wee beasties were all hibernated by now, bit may be I have been misinformed!

  10. #10

    Default Track

    Lizz the track is "Ski ing in the snow" by a group called Wigan's Ovation.
    It's on their greatest hits LP
    Hot dog, jumping frog, Albuquerque

  11. #11
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    I thought the true wild Haggis was extinct and only poor imitations were left? Maybe, (it is a possibility) that they didn't all die out and that the one they thought was the last one shot, which was just after the Boer War, wasn't in fact the last one after all. I might have a photo of one taken in 1870 blob by my great grandfather, ( he came over from Ireland during the potato famine), he was a poacher who kept ferrets and lurchers, a necessity for poaching the wild Haggis in those days. He used to be able to whistle "Land of Hope and Glory" with his mouth closed, especially after a few drams with the local gamekeeper.

    I still think it's a pussy cat!

    nirofo.
    Last edited by nirofo; 05-Feb-10 at 03:38.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nirofo View Post
    I thought the true wild Haggis was extinct and only poor imitations were left? Maybe, (it is a possibility) that they didn't all die out and that the one they thought was the last one shot, which was just after the Boer War, wasn't in fact the last one after all. I might have a photo of one taken in 1870 blob by my great grandfather, ( he came over from Ireland during the potato famine), he was a poacher who kept ferrets and lurchers, a necessity for poaching the wild Haggis in those days. He used to be able to whistle "Land of Hope and Glory" with his mouth closed, especially after a few drams with the local gamekeeper.

    I still think it's a pussy cat!

    nirofo.
    Now as an English person living in Scotland for more than 20 years I have been told all the legends and Lor of Haggis. So you see I am somewhat of an expert. So I'll answer all your questions:

    No they don't hibernate

    No they are not extinct

    Yes they have winter plumage

    and no, they taste bloody horrible!

  13. #13
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    Default To catch a haggis

    You haven't mentioned the fact that they have 4 legs and that 2 (on the same side) are shorter than the opposite 2, which means they can only run round a hill in one direction. After stalking your haggis all day, by lying in wait in the heather, you jump out. Gie it a gluff. Haggis turns round to get away from you and promptly falls (because his short legs are now on the down slope o e hill) rendering him useless!!

    That's how ye catch a Haggis

    Watch oot for e Haggis Waffler tho! He stayed in my loft when i wis a bairn an he used til frighten me senseless wi all e noise he made on a windy night cos he couldna get oot til catch them.

    Still puts shivers doon ma spine.

  14. #14
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    My old great grandfather used to say, (so I'm told), never corner an Haggis unless you've had a few drams and have a couple of fast whippets with you, you should leave your ferrets at home. The Haggis let out a blood chilling screech that leaves you with nightmares for the rest of your life when they're cornered, and then they leap at you, scratching and biting. They reckon the only cure and well known remedy for this fright is to have several double malts and a couple of hot toddies before you go to bed. I can't vouch for this myself as it's only an old wifies tale, (I think?).

    I had a good rummage for the old Wild Haggis photo, but I think it must have been destroyed during the blitz.

    Can't vouch for the two short legs tale, but I remember my grandfather used to fall about laughing when he was telling us about the time the Haggis fell down the hill, I suppose it could have been the double malts and hot toddies that made him fall down laughing though, we were never sure. My mother used to say, ignore the daft old goat, he'll be alright tomorrow!

    nirofo.
    Last edited by nirofo; 05-Feb-10 at 15:29.

  15. #15
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    Talking Soooooo

    Now that I appear to have found the tracks of a very rare wild haggis,does any one know the address of "The Royal and Ancient Haggis Preservation Society," as I had better report the matter with all haste before the season opens.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LIZZ View Post
    Now that I appear to have found the tracks of a very rare wild haggis,does any one know the address of "The Royal and Ancient Haggis Preservation Society," as I had better report the matter with all haste before the season opens.
    You're a bit late, the Haggis hunting season finishes in March, the breeding season starts in April. Mind you, I don't think anyones bagged a real one for many years, although there are rumours of a pair seen near Coldbackie.

    nirofo.

  17. #17
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    I would say a cat myself looking at the prints....i recently discovered my cats prints dont show any claws either....last snow falls prints baffled me till i saw he walking and leaving them, only she holds her tail high when she walked in the snow, so maybe a wild cat?? I have seen them down here in Aberdeenshire.
    Out of my mind. Back in five minutes!!

  18. #18

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    Looks like a small dog that's dragging its feet to me.

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