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Thread: Calling the experts again

  1. #1
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    Question Calling the experts again

    Spotted this huge carpet of flowers by dunnet bay carpark (opposite end from caravan park) and wondered what they were.


    And if that isn't enough to help try the close-up lol
    If its profound what was the name of the golfer and what did he find?

  2. #2
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    Default

    I'm absolutely positive that that is 'Thrift' - Armeria Maritima
    Last edited by Julia; 01-Mar-09 at 23:29.
    Why be a hard rock when you really are a gem!

  3. #3
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    Default Butterbur

    I asked the same question as was surprised to see a bank of it at Castletown beach last year, it's a non native that has escaped from gardens.

  4. #4
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    Exclamation

    Don't think it's Thrift. Thrift is pink flowers.

  5. #5
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    have to agree auldtimer - thrift if pink - seen it growing along the rocks around Dwarick Pier -many years ago

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaldtimer View Post
    Don't think it's Thrift. Thrift is pink flowers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scunner View Post
    have to agree auldtimer - thrift if pink - seen it growing along the rocks around Dwarick Pier -many years ago
    Thrift can either be pink or white, the white is known as 'sea thrift' and the pnk variety 'sea pink'. It's found in all coastal regions. I've never seen white thrift myself, (it's all pink at the Trinkie) but having googled it last night I found out a lot more about it.

    http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Armeriamaritima.htm
    Last edited by Julia; 02-Mar-09 at 13:24. Reason: To add link
    Why be a hard rock when you really are a gem!

  7. #7
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    hmm not sure about it being thrift julia the leaves of the thrift plant is almost like a grass and the leaves on this plant were large and fleshy
    If its profound what was the name of the golfer and what did he find?

  8. #8
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    It's Butterburr...I posted about it last year complete with photograph .

  9. #9
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    ahh thanks for that lizz i am slowly building up my knowledge
    If its profound what was the name of the golfer and what did he find?

  10. #10

    Default White Butterburr

    Hi, Count.

    This is White Butterbur (Petasites albus). It's native home is in Europe where it lives in mountain woods. It has been introduced into Caithness where it is proving rather invasive. It comes into flower early in the season because it has a lot of food stored in its underground roots and stems, so it is not reliant on making food from sunlight and warmth. Later it will put up some large coarse round leaves and build its stored food supplies back up. It occurs in several places in the county, notably Thurso riverside, various bits of the Cliff at Wick and this patch in Castlehill.
    Last edited by Taraxacum; 05-Mar-09 at 21:16.

  11. #11

    Default Yes, while very common along the coast ...........

    Quote Originally Posted by Julia View Post
    Thrift can either be pink or white, the white is known as 'sea thrift' and the pnk variety 'sea pink'. It's found in all coastal regions. I've never seen white thrift myself, (it's all pink at the Trinkie) it last night I found.
    The pink version also occurs on the summits of several of the hills in northern Sutherland.

    I have seen what I assume is the white version in a few spots along the north Sutherland coast, for example between Armadale and Strathy Point.
    Despite having a guidebook, I find it hard to distinguish between some species. I would like to spend some time taking photos of them but on the coast it is invariably windy when I am there.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprint95m View Post
    The pink version also occurs on the summits of several of the hills in northern Sutherland.

    I have seen what I assume is the white version in a few spots along the north Sutherland coast, for example between Armadale and Strathy Point.
    Despite having a guidebook, I find it hard to distinguish between some species. I would like to spend some time taking photos of them but on the coast it is invariably windy when I am there.
    yeah i tend to have the same problem and with me working again now i find it increasingly difficult to get out and about as much these days. but i do have the bonus of having a car now so i get a little further afield these days lol. i am slowly building up a library of photos of native flowers for these parts and hope to eventually become a grand master of flora like Taraxacum
    If its profound what was the name of the golfer and what did he find?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taraxacum View Post
    Hi, Count.

    This is White Butterbur (Petasites albus). It's native home is in Europe where it lives in mountain woods. It has been introduced into Caithness where it is proving rather invasive.
    May I ask who introduced it into Caithness and why?


  14. #14

    Default Who put it there?

    Hi, Wifie,

    I don't know who put it there. Often people put an invasive thing in their garden, then find it too vigorous and dig it up. Not being willing to "waste it", it gets deposited in a public place. There are clumps of rhubarb and Montbretia which definitely came into the public space that way.

  15. #15
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    Here's a couple of photo's of the red variety of Butterbur, I've got shots of the white version somewhere, I'll post them when I find them.

    Butterbur (Red variety).


    Butterbur (Red variety) close-up.


    nirofo.
    Last edited by nirofo; 13-Mar-09 at 20:53.

  16. #16
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    It seems there is some confusion between Butterbur and Thrift, here is a photo of Thrift taken at Sarclet last year.

    Thrift.


    nirofo.

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