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Thread: Juniper

  1. #1

    Default Juniper

    Where is there Juniper in Caithness?

    There are two sorts - common juniper and prostrate juniper. Juniper is rare in Europe and UK has a good bit of it. The Cairngorms is the main area for common juniper and the North Coast is the main area for prostrate juniper.

    There is a lot of prostrate juniper on Dunnet Head. Climb to the very top of Burifa Hill to see a good colony. There is some on Scrabster Hill and Ravenshill (West of Thurso). Is there any more that folks know about?

  2. #2
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    Default

    Think there's some out at Forsinard.

  3. #3
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    Default Juniper Photo

    See a photo of Juniper on Caithness.org at
    http://www.caithness.org/nature/biod...ery=1&image=47

    Juniper also got a mention in the History of Caithness by J T Calder in Chpater One - see below
    “But the most remarkable evidence of ancient woods in Caithness, “ says the author of the New Statistical Account of Wick, “ is found in the Bay of Keiss. Between the links and the sand, and running down under the sea, are found the remains of a submarine forest. These are, like peat-moss, entirely composed of decayed wood. The barks of various kinds of trees are quite discernible, and even the seeds of birch and ash are so well preserved as to appear but lately taken from the tree”. But if Caithness is destitute of trees nature has liberally supplied it with plants and flowers; and in this respect, it offers a highly interesting field to the botanist. The native flowering plants and ferns enumerated amount to about 420. In the moors, and along the hill-sides, which are covered with the finest heather, you find, in their proper season, the bilberry, the cranberry, and the barberry. The Scotch myrtle, thyme, woodbine and juniper, are also to be met with in several places. White and red clovers are indigenous. The different species of wild flowers are innumerable. Amongst these may be particularised the bird’s-eye primrose, the Scotch primrose, the blue-bell, the foxpglove, and the beautiful gem called the white flower of Parnassus. The following with their Linnaean names, are some of the more rara and interesting plants hitherto not regarded as natives of the county:- Draba incana, Pyrus aria, Saxifraga stallaris, S. tridactylites, Valeriana dioica, Hieracium boreale, H. prenanthoides, Arctostaphylos, alpina , Anchusa semper virens, Veronica polita, Rumex sanguinens, Juneus Balticus, Carex limosa, Osmunda regalis, Isotes lacustris, Lycopodium Annotinum, etc.

    More of the book can be found at http://www.caithness.org/history/his...ness/index.htm
    Work is ongoing to complete the work on the web site.

    Juniper is also used a Street Name in Thurso - "Juniper Bank"
    Last edited by Bill Fernie; 20-Oct-07 at 15:47.

  4. #4

    Default Juniper

    There are areas of prostrate juniper on the rocky hillside along the roadside between Guidebest and Leodibest (above Latheronwheel village).

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Fernie View Post
    See a photo of Juniper on Caithness.org at
    http://www.caithness.org/nature/biodiversitycollection/photogallery/index.php?gallery=1&image=47

    Juniper also got a mention in the History of Caithness by J T Calder in Chpater One - see below
    “But the most remarkable evidence of ancient woods in Caithness, “ says the author of the New Statistical Account of Wick, “ is found in the Bay of Keiss. Between the links and the sand, and running down under the sea, are found the remains of a submarine forest. These are, like peat-moss, entirely composed of decayed wood. The barks of various kinds of trees are quite discernible, and even the seeds of birch and ash are so well preserved as to appear but lately taken from the tree”. "


    Must have been covered by the shifting sands. Pity, i would love to see it.

    I've dug quite a few hazel nuts out of the peat over by the old sand workings near Castle Dirlot.

  6. #6
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    Default Confused

    Having checked the link that Bill posted, I am now very confused.
    I was shown a jumper plant last time up north and it looked more upright..prostrate juniper makes sense as that would be low to the ground, has any one a picture of both kinds?
    Ohhhh and which one's berries are used for flavouring gin and making medicinal balms or can they both be used?

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