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Thread: Jumped or Jamp?

  1. #1

    Default Jumped or Jamp?

    Yet again I have been trying to correct my children on their use of the English language.
    My youngest son was telling a story of how he jumped of a wall and hurt himself. My eldest son (who is ten) said, "you never jumped, you jamp". He insisted on arguing that it was correct and I eventually got him to try to find it in the dictionary, to which he stated that the dictionary must be wrong or out of date as jamp sounds better than jumped and all his friends use it. I have to admit that my dictionary is a good few years old now and I am maybe the one who is out of date.

    It's got me wondering and I'm off now to buy an up to date dictionary.
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  2. #2

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    i would say jumped but thats just me
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    There is no such word as 'jamp'. It is an utter abomination.

    I would question the teachers here - the kids must be using this word in class. Are their teachers correcting them?

    Or, do the kids know fine well that it is wrong, and defer from using it in class?
    "It makes my blood burn with metal energy..."

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    I never heard jamp til i lived in Caithness but its in common use there.. My eldest lad says jamp all the time is it a dialect thing?

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    Haha... Proper English = definitely Jumped!

    But dialect.... Jamp is used in North Wales, so maybe it's migrating across!

    And Erli... psst... don't go buying a dictionary, you have the biggest one in the world at your fingertips right now!

    Julie
    I wish I'd picked more daisies.........(anon)

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    Must be a dialect thing, its not even in the Dictionary of Scots words
    http://www.dsl.ac.uk/dsl/
    Once the original Grumpy Owld Man but alas no more

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    Unhappy Jumped....

    Quote Originally Posted by squidge View Post
    I never heard jamp til i lived in Caithness but its in common use there.. My eldest lad says jamp all the time is it a dialect thing?
    Same here, I am always correcting their grammar. They hate it but that is just tough. Is grammar ignored in school these days as well as spelling?

    ..

    Spring has sprung, the grass is ris', I wonder where the birdies is, the birdies is on d' wing, now thats absurd, everyone knows d' wing is on d' bird


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    Golach, there's mention of it here, in the comments section....

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest...research.shtml
    I wish I'd picked more daisies.........(anon)

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    I never heard jamp until I moved to Caithness and even then it was only in the younger generation so I don't think it is a dialect thing but more of you young person's slang.
    On a similar note does anyone else feel like pulling their hair out when they hear someone say "he learned me how to do that"?
    There are two rules for success:
    1. Never tell people everything you know

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    I never heard jamp until I moved to Caithness and even then it was only in the younger generation so I don't think it is a dialect thing but more of you young person's slang.
    On a similar note does anyone else feel like pulling their hair out when they hear someone say "he learned me how to do that"?
    Tristan,
    I correct peoples grammar all the time, apart from slang, which I'm terribly guilty of myself!

    My pet hate is when Nikki talks about Christee-uns... Oh, I ALWAYS correct her with , No, it's Chrischyuns!
    Tsk!
    I wish I'd picked more daisies.........(anon)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    I never heard jamp until I moved to Caithness and even then it was only in the younger generation so I don't think it is a dialect thing but more of you young person's slang.
    On a similar note does anyone else feel like pulling their hair out when they hear someone say "he learned me how to do that"?
    I would agree that it must be "dialect slang".

    What's even worse, Tristan, is when you hear someone say "he teached me how to do that"

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    I thought it was just me. Another one that drives me mad is, an Americanism - he dove into the water. No he didn't he dived into it.
    Or is it just me.
    Two things are infinite: the Universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the Universe.

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    I never heard the "word" jamp until I moved to Caithness. My son picked it up at school and it's ingrained in him now.
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    Geo, every time he says it, ask him to repeat what he said until he says 'jumped' instead of 'jamp'.

    "I'm sorry son, what was that you said? It makes no sense to me."

    If the teachers don't/won't teach them, then we have to pick up the baton and run with it ourselves.
    "It makes my blood burn with metal energy..."

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    Yeah I do that but it's become so natural to him it will take a while. He's just finished school so maybe I will have more success now.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metalattakk View Post
    There is no such word as 'jamp'. It is an utter abomination.

    I would question the teachers here - the kids must be using this word in class. Are their teachers correcting them?

    Or, do the kids know fine well that it is wrong, and defer from using it in class?
    That's it blame te teachers!!!! I guess the children have picked it up long before school, use at at home and in the holidays and have never been corrected by the people who brought them into this world and looked for someone to blame for all their ills.

    Either see the light or take a running 'jamp'.

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    In fact a little bit of rummaging and it turns out "jamp" is a scots word - used by RM Ballantyne and is shown in a ballad from 1860 ish called " Lamentation on the loss of the whittle"

    It was also used by Lewis Carroll in "sylvie and Bruno" around the 1890's i think

    It appears to be of dundee/perthshire origin but i have seen it referred to as shetlandic in origin too.

    Isnt this a natural part of the development of language though? it might be "wrong" today but then it might be "right" tomorrow. Language is a living growing and changing beast. It doesnt stand still and it is not a respector of mums and dads, grandparents or anyone else. The scots language is a rich and resonant language in its own right - its apparently NOT simply a dialect of english , in fact a liguist friend of mine said Scots is related to english in the way portugese is related to spanish - of the same root but not the same language. If your child says "jamp" instead of jumped you maybe should celebrate their "scottishness" instead of crrecting them - although i can see that might not always be very popular

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    Quote Originally Posted by Metalattakk View Post
    If the teachers don't/won't teach them, then we have to pick up the baton and run with it ourselves.
    I would never expect a teacher to take the lead role in correcting slang -- chances are children use slang more frequently outside the school than in the classroom. Parents should always have the baton and not assume that it is the teacher's responsibility to teach their children everything.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by squidge View Post
    In fact a little bit of rummaging and it turns out "jamp" is a scots word - used by RM Ballantyne and is shown in a ballad from 1860 ish called " Lamentation on the loss of the whittle"

    It was also used by Lewis Carroll in "sylvie and Bruno" around the 1890's i think

    It appears to be of dundee/perthshire origin but i have seen it referred to as shetlandic in origin too.

    Isnt this a natural part of the development of language though? it might be "wrong" today but then it might be "right" tomorrow. Language is a living growing and changing beast. It doesnt stand still and it is not a respector of mums and dads, grandparents or anyone else. The scots language is a rich and resonant language in its own right - its apparently NOT simply a dialect of english , in fact a liguist friend of mine said Scots is related to english in the way portugese is related to spanish - of the same root but not the same language. If your child says "jamp" instead of jumped you maybe should celebrate their "scottishness" instead of crrecting them - although i can see that might not always be very popular
    Yes Squidge, our language is developing all the time. In Shakespeare's day you would not have found the words doesn't, couldn't, shan't and can't but today they are in every day use.

    I must admit I am a bit of a grammar and spelling freak myself and the one that definitely bugs me most is "definately".....

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    Default Taught

    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    I never heard jamp until I moved to Caithness and even then it was only in the younger generation so I don't think it is a dialect thing but more of you young person's slang.
    On a similar note does anyone else feel like pulling their hair out when they hear someone say "he learned me how to do that"?
    I HATE THAT....I was taught therefore I learned....a family member says it and I have found myself gritting my teeth...

    Spring has sprung, the grass is ris', I wonder where the birdies is, the birdies is on d' wing, now thats absurd, everyone knows d' wing is on d' bird


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