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Thread: New Garden

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default New Garden

    just moved hoose. and its a very exposed spot on fresh ground (previously used for farm/grass stuff) - apart from tatties on it what else would you recommend for it?

    right on coast and pretty windy, very little shelter. all ideas (and cuttings) gratefully received.

    muchus thanks
    I am the sundance kid, coming to you with a groove and a positive

  2. #2
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    I can only think of a variety of ornamental grasses, and some thrift (sea pinks) and lavender....and set up some windbreaks ...

  3. #3
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    As Angela says your gonna need to sort out your wind breaks first.

    You will need a permiable barrier such as a hedge so that the wind will filter through and dissipate the force.

    Plant wise I'd suggest low growing hardy shrubs and ornamental grasses.

    Asta Alpinus is perfect of exposed sites as it is compact but also has a lovelt bright pink flower.

    Chaenomeles x Superba 'Pink Lady' would also survive but would need to be grown against a wall.

    Tamarix tetrandra makes a perfect windbreak for exposed gardens.

    Sambucus nigra and Spiraea should also be suitable.
    ***Om Mani Padme Hum***

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victoria View Post
    As Angela says your gonna need to sort out your wind breaks first.

    You will need a permiable barrier such as a hedge so that the wind will filter through and dissipate the force.

    Plant wise I'd suggest low growing hardy shrubs and ornamental grasses.

    Asta Alpinus is perfect of exposed sites as it is compact but also has a lovelt bright pink flower.

    Chaenomeles x Superba 'Pink Lady' would also survive but would need to be grown against a wall.

    Tamarix tetrandra makes a perfect windbreak for exposed gardens.

    Sambucus nigra and Spiraea should also be suitable.
    I'm hopeless at remembering the names of plants, Victoria, and my gardening books are all in store, so I can picture ones I think might be suitable but don't know their names.
    It would depend on whether the soil's acid or alkaline as well, wouldn't it?
    I think you're right -start with deciding the shape of the garden and put in some windbreaks...then plant forwards from them, with grasses and shrubs.
    Ones that have berries or where the leaves change colour in autumn are nice -but as I say, I can't think of the names....
    The charlatans could pop in some bulbs (nothing too tall, but snowdrops and other small ones maybe?) in the autumn for next spring.
    Mistakes I've made in the past have been rushing to put in plants in a sort of random way before thinking about the overall effect...it can take years to establish a garden, but well worth it.

  5. #5
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    thrumster
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    Wink

    charlatans how are you, glad to hear you have moved in to your new housey....

    escalonia is a great caithness hardy hedge, (it is the one dad has round his garden..) it doesn't mind the wind or the salt.

    gives a shout and I can sort you out with cuttings of that, and various other bits and pieces of trees etc..

    we are in the same position as you, trying to get shelter round ours..

  6. #6
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    Wink

    should have said in the last posting.

    other things you could try to provide shelter are
    willow trees, fir trees, (any of the other big trees found in the area) flowering currant, rosa rogosa (dog rose hedge).

    I have all these growing at the mo, so far so good......

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyncraig View Post
    should have said in the last posting.

    other things you could try to provide shelter are
    willow trees, fir trees, (any of the other big trees found in the area) flowering currant, rosa rogosa (dog rose hedge).

    I have all these growing at the mo, so far so good......
    Just remember that willows shouldnt be planted near to the house or not at all if you have a small garden because they have such a large root system which can cause structual damage to buildings and they take up A LOT of water from the garden!!
    ***Om Mani Padme Hum***

  8. #8
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    if your garden is a decent size and you have a septic tank and a soak away system they can help to make this work better, by removing some of the excess water from the ground.
    It will depend on whether your ground tends to get water logged.

  9. #9

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    Blackthorn, beech, hawthorn, willow, cotoneaster, oleaster, tamarisk, Sea buckthorn, Scotch rose, Rosa rugosa. These will all grow in extreme open areas and will tolerate salt air. They will form a good hedge.

    The chap in the garden centre in Castletown is extremelyhelpful.

    Ashridge Trees sell a coastal hedge pack but not until next winter.

    http://store.ashridgetrees.co.uk/Trees-Home

  10. #10
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    Thanks very much to everyone who replyed here.

    BT haven't managed to connect me yet and i'm on my mums computer tonight and collecting all my hints and tips.

    We have some willow but thanks - i think i've planted it too close to the house and its clay like soil, slightly waterbound so it should help with the septic tank.

    Am not going for much wind breaks as i feel it would detract from the openness which is what i like about it and want plants that 'don't mind the wind'.

    3 rows of Sharpes tatties in, courtesy of my mum, got a few bits and pieces in from my previous garden and lots of space. We had a few daffs put in about January and was delighted that they have been up and shone their bonny yellow heids at me. Canny wait for autumn and a big bag of bulbs...

    Cheers greenfingered peeps.
    I am the sundance kid, coming to you with a groove and a positive

  11. #11
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    We have pretty much the same sort of thing here.
    I'm finding that Hebe does exceptionally well (I'm not sure of the name but it has purple flowers and is about 4ft tall and wide). Hosta's do really well as do the garden geraniums (cranesbill), day lilly, flag Iris, Saxifraga, Aquilegia, Himalayan honeysuckle, willow.
    We really are exposed here but most things seem to do quite well. I even have Gladioli growing happily although they do need staking due to the wind.

    My motto is 'plant it and it's got two choices'.

    Anything that needs slightly acidic soil such as Pieris, rhodo's, Azalea etc etc either plant in tubs in ericaceous compost and sink into the ground or plant them directly into the ground and treat with sulphur each year. Mine are all thriving.

    Wind seems to be the biggest killer for me and it will strip my Hebe's of leaves in a day in winter (they;re evergreen) but they come back again in no time at all and are so easy to propagate (simply cut none flowering stems about 4" with a set of leaves and stick them in water with rooting compound till they root and then pot on - soooo easy)
    Willows are easy too - just pull off new shoots, trim to about 12", stick in water with rooting compound then pot on into sodding wet compost. Easy peasy!
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.

    http://thetenaciousgardener.blogspot.co.uk/

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