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Thread: Ticks

  1. #1

    Default Ticks

    Watch out folks these wee blighters are out in force. Check yourselves and pets for them after a walk.

    If Found, If no tools are available, rather than delay use a cotton thread. Tie a single loop of cotton around the tick’s mouthparts, as close to the skin as possible, then pull upwards and outwards without twisting. DO start by cleansing the tweezers/tool with antiseptic. After tick removal, cleanse the bite site and the tool with antiseptic.
    DO wash hands thoroughly afterwards.
    DO save the tick in a container in case a doctor asks for evidence that you have been bitten (label it with date and location).
    DO NOT squeeze the body of the tick, as this may cause the head and body to separate, leaving the head embedded in your skin.
    DO NOT use your fingernails to remove a tick. Infection can enter via any breaks in your skin, e.g. close to the fingernail.
    DO NOT crush the tick’s body, as this may cause it to regurgitate its infected stomach contents into the bite wound.

    DO NOT try to burn the tick off, apply petroleum jelly, nail polish or any other chemical. Any of these methods can cause discomfort to the tick, resulting in regurgitation, or saliva release.


    Alternatively, kill the tick by crushing it and flushing it down the toilet, or by folding it in a strip of sticky tape and placing it in the waste. Be aware that engorged ticks will contain potentially infected blood, which may splatter when crushed. Do not crush the tick with your fingers and do not allow the crushed tick or the blood it carried to contact your skin.

    The tick that generally bites humans can be as small as a poppy seed or full stop on this page. Small children are generally bitten above the waist—check their hairline and scalp. Do NOT use eyebrow tweezers to remove a tick as this may squash it. Use a proper tick removal tool.
    Last edited by sam09; 06-Jul-15 at 17:10.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wick
    Posts
    4,780

    Default

    Thank you for the heads up sam09, some useful tips to rid these unpleasant little critters.
    A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Watten
    Posts
    4,576

    Default

    Been bitten already...piriton..paracetamol..antiboitics...sigh !
    Autan bought and will be used as a detterent.
    Wristbands impregnated with DEET obtained.
    Prevention measures.
    Apply insect reppellant with DEET.
    Wear long sleeved tops tucked into trousers with a belt.. Trousers tucked into socks.
    Stop and check and brush off clothing regulary to get rid of crawlers.
    If possible change your clothes after the walk and bag them to be washed at 60 deg when you get home.
    When you get home check yourself all over....and have a bath/shower.
    Check again over the next couple of days....
    Tick hooks can be bought at the vets.
    Tick lasso was bought at Horsing around.
    Saw a you tube video on how to remove ticks with a moistened q tip ...you roll the tick anticlockwise and it drops off.
    Last edited by Dadie; 06-Jul-15 at 22:25.
    Life is too short to spend it in beige underwear!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Caithness
    Posts
    48

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    La-la Land
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    That thing looks good Raymac. Does it come in a larger size? Don't think it would have handled the last one we took out of the dog!
    I really hate being bipolar. It's awesome!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Watten
    Posts
    4,576

    Default

    You get a pack of 2 at the vets.
    A smaller one and a larger one!
    The smaller one is a bit big for tiny ticks but they do work well!
    Life is too short to spend it in beige underwear!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Nr. Thurso
    Posts
    935

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    Poppy, my nine year old Bichon had been rubbing her bottom for a couple of days. Yesterday I found a tick embedded in the rim of her anus!! Poor thing, luckily I have a hook as seen in raymac's post and removed it post haste... dirty little blighters.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sam09 View Post
    Watch out folks these wee blighters are out in force. Check yourselves and pets for them after a walk.

    If Found, If no tools are available, rather than delay use a cotton thread. Tie a single loop of cotton around the tick’s mouthparts, as close to the skin as possible, then pull upwards and outwards without twisting. DO start by cleansing the tweezers/tool with antiseptic. After tick removal, cleanse the bite site and the tool with antiseptic.
    DO wash hands thoroughly afterwards.
    DO save the tick in a container in case a doctor asks for evidence that you have been bitten (label it with date and location).
    DO NOT squeeze the body of the tick, as this may cause the head and body to separate, leaving the head embedded in your skin.
    DO NOT use your fingernails to remove a tick. Infection can enter via any breaks in your skin, e.g. close to the fingernail.
    DO NOT crush the tick’s body, as this may cause it to regurgitate its infected stomach contents into the bite wound.

    DO NOT try to burn the tick off, apply petroleum jelly, nail polish or any other chemical. Any of these methods can cause discomfort to the tick, resulting in regurgitation, or saliva release.


    Alternatively, kill the tick by crushing it and flushing it down the toilet, or by folding it in a strip of sticky tape and placing it in the waste. Be aware that engorged ticks will contain potentially infected blood, which may splatter when crushed. Do not crush the tick with your fingers and do not allow the crushed tick or the blood it carried to contact your skin.

    The tick that generally bites humans can be as small as a poppy seed or full stop on this page. Small children are generally bitten above the waist—check their hairline and scalp. Do NOT use eyebrow tweezers to remove a tick as this may squash it. Use a proper tick removal tool.

    They are back with ever increasing numbers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Reay
    Posts
    1,091

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sam09 View Post
    Watch out folks these wee blighters are out in force. Check yourselves and pets for them after a walk.

    If Found, If no tools are available, rather than delay use a cotton thread. Tie a single loop of cotton around the tick’s mouthparts, as close to the skin as possible, then pull upwards and outwards without twisting. DO start by cleansing the tweezers/tool with antiseptic. After tick removal, cleanse the bite site and the tool with antiseptic.
    DO wash hands thoroughly afterwards.
    DO save the tick in a container in case a doctor asks for evidence that you have been bitten (label it with date and location).
    DO NOT squeeze the body of the tick, as this may cause the head and body to separate, leaving the head embedded in your skin.
    DO NOT use your fingernails to remove a tick. Infection can enter via any breaks in your skin, e.g. close to the fingernail.
    DO NOT crush the tick’s body, as this may cause it to regurgitate its infected stomach contents into the bite wound.

    DO NOT try to burn the tick off, apply petroleum jelly, nail polish or any other chemical. Any of these methods can cause discomfort to the tick, resulting in regurgitation, or saliva release.


    Alternatively, kill the tick by crushing it and flushing it down the toilet, or by folding it in a strip of sticky tape and placing it in the waste. Be aware that engorged ticks will contain potentially infected blood, which may splatter when crushed. Do not crush the tick with your fingers and do not allow the crushed tick or the blood it carried to contact your skin.

    The tick that generally bites humans can be as small as a poppy seed or full stop on this page. Small children are generally bitten above the waist—check their hairline and scalp. Do NOT use eyebrow tweezers to remove a tick as this may squash it. Use a proper tick removal tool.
    Good advice and yes they are out in force! I've taken about a dozen off the cat so far this year - 2 large ones off his face in the past week
    Green but not brainwashed

    Using the sun to provide hot water.
    Driving a car that gets 73 miles per gallon.....

  10. #10

    Default

    Further medical advice is to insist on a blood test for Lyme disease. Don`t be put off by any doctor, insist on this being done. Its for your own safety.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Broubster, Caithness
    Posts
    19

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    This device seemed to work well for me recently
    http://www.tickcard.co.uk/
    All the other types failed.
    I'm holding off on a blood test as advised that there is no need if the tell-tale bulls-eye doesn't show up within a couple of weeks. The bite shows red, surrounded by lighter coloured skin and that surrounded by another red ring. I'm keeping a daily./nightly eye on it.
    I had the team at Thurso Hospital remove it and they tried several methods and the card was by far and away the better option for me.
    Best Regards
    Steve Marquis
    Broubster, Caithness
    It is better to travel well than to arrive

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Caithness
    Posts
    182

    Default

    We have been using Bravecto for the dogs, although expensive does last the three months.

  13. #13

    Default

    I ordered the tick card only yesterday and it came in the post today so well pleased!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wick
    Posts
    4,780

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    I got a pair of "Twisters" from the vet as this year seems to have been bad for ticks with our two Boxers. Mrs M likes using them as she is very sadistic, but at least she leaves me alone now looking for black heads to squeeze.
    A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Broubster, Caithness
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Here's a bit on ticks from the guardian
    Best Regards
    Steve Marquis
    Broubster, Caithness
    It is better to travel well than to arrive

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveMarquis View Post
    Here's a bit on ticks from the guardian
    Thanks for that Steve. Good reading and advice for all. I would still advise a course of antibiotics if bitten by a tick. Too late when symptoms show.
    Last edited by sam09; 23-Aug-17 at 21:58. Reason: Letter in wrong place

  17. #17

    Default

    Ticks are in ever increasing numbers again this year. Take care and check yourselves and your pets.

  18. #18

    Default

    Get a blood test. You can have Lymes with no rash,I know as I tested positive,don't wait until you feel unwell as it's not a lot of fun!!!

  19. #19

    Default

    Well said Iain. Insist on blood test always. It is to late when bullseye appears.

  20. #20

    Default

    The media are at last covering the rise in Tick population and there are is a lot of medical research now going on about Lymes Disease.

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