Caithness Map :: Links to Site Map Paying too much for broadband? Move to PlusNet broadband and save£££s. Free setup now available - terms apply. PlusNet broadband.  
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Div Ye Mind Interpretation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    18

    Default Div Ye Mind Interpretation

    Hi from NZ
    My late father used to sing the words of Div Ye Mind to us when we were younger. He has since passed on and on looking through some papers I found the poem again and would like someone to translate the third verse for me.
    Div ye mind 'e Knotty Club wi' its game and ragged band,
    Fa's clubs wis bandaged kail runts, or anything at hand?
    Noo an' then a tae wis opened wi'a whistle fae e' ba',
    An e' linin' o' a pockad wis pit roond wi' a straw!
    Div ye mind boy Eh? Div ye mind.


    Thanks for some help Robertc

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Knotty: a game like shinty or hockey.

    Fa's: whose

    Kail runts (or rownks): cabbage stalks

    Occasionally someone's toe was cut by a glancing blow from the ball

    They tore the pocket lining from a garment to dress the wound, bound with straw.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wick
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Can't interpret the poem but here is a little starter from wikepedia:

    The game of knotty is a Scottish team sport. It is a variation of the game of shinty as played in the fishing communities of Lybster, Caithness. It used to be played widely in the town, as was shinty in the rest of Caithness, but it ceased to be played around the end of the 19th Century, until 1993 when it was revived by local enthusiasts.
    It involves a stick (knotty), which can be almost any form of wooden implement, and a cork fishing float as ball with varying sizes of players. Local history books suggest knotty was invented by the fishing wives of Lybster – once one of the Europe's busiest herring ports – to help keep their men sober when they were ashore. However, whilst this would have been a fine side effect of the game, the sport draws from the same prevalence of stick-ball games throughout Scotland at that time, many of which became codified into shinty in other areas.
    With the rundown of the industry in the late 19th century, knotty fell into abeyance until local hotelier, the late Bert Mowat, found a copy containing the few rules of the sport wedged between the pages of a Gaelic bible in a bedroom.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Wick, Caithness
    Posts
    1,551

    Default

    The full poem by John Horne can be found in this thread from 2005 -http://forum.caithness.org/showthread.php?1862-Div-Ye-Mind&highlight=caithness poetry

    T
    his format has been used many times with the opening line "Div ye mind" and the author or speaker adding their own lines to recall things or events in their lives.

    See this version from Castlegreen http://www.caithness.org/fpb/2013/se...ery=9&image=11
    Last edited by maggie; 30-Sep-13 at 23:17.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Thanks to those folk who replied to my query.
    Regards Robertc

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •