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BetterTogether
31-Aug-15, 22:52
Another total waste of taxpayers money

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3217093/Police-Scotland-blasted-spending-taxpayers-money-rebranding-force-helicopter-Scots-Gaelic.html

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 07:57
The Gaelic Scotland Act 2005 was placed on the statute books by a Scottish Labour government. The bill was originally presented by Labour MSP education minister Peter Peacock. By the act all public bodies are required to submit a Gaelic plan to Bord na Gaidhlig the government appointed quango responsible for the promotion of Gaelic in a modern Scotland. Police Scotland as a public body will by law have had to present a Gaelic plan to the Bord
. Similarly in Caithness. Highland council will have submitted a Gaelic plan to the Bord and anything Gaelic you see around you will have been as a direct result of the Gaelic act and the Scottish unionists who brought it to law.

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 07:57
Another total waste of taxpayers money

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3217093/Police-Scotland-blasted-spending-taxpayers-money-rebranding-force-helicopter-Scots-Gaelic.html

I just cannot see the point myself. When my children took languages at school, Gaelic certainly was'nt one of them. Latin, being a dead language is more useful than Gaelic.

squidge
01-Sep-15, 09:38
Whether people see the point of this or not - this is happening because the UK government signed up to the EU charter on minority languages which was drawn up as far back as 1998. Also because people with a modicum of intelligence and foresight understand the massive benefits of bilingualism and that the ability to speak a second language fluently is a useful, never mind wonderful gift to give to our children. that is recognised in Britain, and the rest of Europe it's a shame people don't recognise it here.

davth
01-Sep-15, 09:58
Squidge What use is Gaelic in today's world?

BetterTogether
01-Sep-15, 10:17
I speak English German French And spanish and fully enjoy using them can't say I've ever had the requirement to speak Gaelic. It's a minority language hardly used and the amount of money wasted on it by political numpties trying to foist petty ideology on us is unbelievable.

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 10:58
I speak English German French And spanish and fully enjoy using them can't say I've ever had the requirement to speak Gaelic. It's a minority language hardly used and the amount of money wasted on it by political numpties trying to foist petty ideology on us is unbelievable.

My son took German and French as at University he sat his degree in accountancy and European business studies. The company he works for now has offices in Berlin and Paris, the fact he could speak these languages was one of the reasons he secured his position. He has now started to learn Japanese, as he is interested in computer programming, and seemingly that helps!

rob murray
01-Sep-15, 11:00
Whether people see the point of this or not - this is happening because the UK government signed up to the EU charter on minority languages which was drawn up as far back as 1998. Also because people with a modicum of intelligence and foresight understand the massive benefits of bilingualism and that the ability to speak a second language fluently is a useful, never mind wonderful gift to give to our children. that is recognised in Britain, and the rest of Europe it's a shame people don't recognise it here.

AT best the EU charter acts to conserve cultural traditions which left unchecked / unsubsidised would die out......Scottish Gaelic is of no practical useage anywhere unless you want a job on BBC Alba

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 20:53
I have to admit I'm coming round to the idea of a Scotland that never forgets it's past and respects other people for what they are.
Gaelic in Scotland's been controversial since the Scottish parliament decreed its rescue. That's good because before then it was spoken in whispers. The Gaelic movements come a long way in 10 years. I wish them the best of luck

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 21:01
I have to admit I'm coming round to the idea of a Scotland that never forgets it's past and respects other people for what they are.
Gaelic in Scotland's been controversial since the Scottish parliament decreed its rescue. That's good because before then it was spoken in whispers. The Gaelic movements come a long way in 10 years. I wish them the best of luck

I can understand the road signs being controversial. but why is Gaelic controversial in general ?

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 21:36
I'm not really sure why it's so controversial. This thread alone turns up some very interesting comments and opinions about Gaelic. Its being presented as a useless language by most of you but it's the indigenous language of Scotland. There are thousands upon thousands of native Gaelic speaking people living in Scotland today and many more thousands who are connected to the spirit or whatever you want to call it.
Did you know that as late as the 1960s the British state and its Scottish cohorts were still punishing native Gaelic speaking children if they were caught talking Gaelic in the school playground? That's controversial too.

golach
01-Sep-15, 21:48
Why not write it in Polish, there are more Polish speakers in Scotland than there a Gaelic speakers

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 22:08
I'm not really sure why it's so controversial. This thread alone turns up some very interesting comments and opinions about Gaelic. Its being presented as a useless language by most of you but it's the indigenous language of Scotland. There are thousands upon thousands of native Gaelic speaking people living in Scotland today and many more thousands who are connected to the spirit or whatever you want to call it.
Did you know that as late as the 1960s the British state and its Scottish cohorts were still punishing native Gaelic speaking children if they were caught talking Gaelic in the school playground? That's controversial too.

I actually did'nt know that. I come from a part of Scotland where Gaelic was never mentioned never mind spoken, certainly not in schools anyway. Maybe years ago people from certain areas of Scotland used to speak only Gaelic on a daily basis and some probably still do, but to communicate with the rest of Scotland, they would also have to speak English. If people want to learn to speak Gaelic, that's fine I do'nt have a problem with that, but not as a school subject. I do'nt know whether schools in the Highlands and Islands have Gaelic as a language option, as in the school I went to it was French or German, but certainly Gaelic was not an option.

As I said though to me speaking Gaelic is'nt controversial, but again that could be because of where I was brought up.

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 22:15
Don't you think It's controversial that you think the indigenous language of your country should not be taught at school?

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 22:17
Why not write it in Polish, there are more Polish speakers in Scotland than there a Gaelic speakers
I imagine it's because Polish is the indigenous language of Poland.:confused

sids
01-Sep-15, 22:27
Don't you think It's controversial that you think the indigenous language of your country should not be taught at school?

Do you speak Gaelic?

If not, it ain't your language.

gleeber
01-Sep-15, 22:28
Isnt aint an Americanism?

sids
01-Sep-15, 22:36
Isnt aint an Americanism?

Who's to say?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ain%27t

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 22:48
Don't you think It's controversial that you think the indigenous language of your country should not be taught at school?

In all honesty no. This is a paragraph from the Dundee Courier -

"Although Gaelic has not been widely used in Dundee in recent times, it was spoken at some time virtually everywhere in Scotland. Gaelic was likely the dominant language in Dundee between around 800-1200 AD but was still being spoken in 1791 when a Gaelic chapel was built in Dundee for ‘Highlanders recently arrived in the town’."

That was in response to the 2005 act you were talking about. As you can see, speaking Gaelic does not feature greatly where I come from.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Scottish_council_areas_by_number_of_Scotti sh_Gaelic_speakers

I am from number 20 by the way.

cptdodger
01-Sep-15, 22:58
I found this on Wikipedia -


Historically, the dominant language in Angus was Pictish until the sixth to seventh centuries AD when the area became progressively gaelicised, with Pictish extinct by the mid-ninth century. Gaelic/ Middle Irish began to retreat from lowland areas in the late-eleventh century and was absent from the Eastern lowlands by the fourteenth century. It was replaced there by Middle Scots, the contemporary local South Northern dialect of Modern Scots while Gaelic persisted as a majority language in the highland Glens until the 19th century. Scottish English is now increasingly replacing Scots.

So in reality, where I come from my original language was not Gaelic, it was Pictish.

golach
01-Sep-15, 23:35
I imagine it's because Polish is the indigenous language of Poland.:confusedBut Gaelic is not the indigenous language of Scotland, I am not confused

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 13:33
I have to admit I'm coming round to the idea of a Scotland that never forgets it's past and respects other people for what they are.


Just to say, that's where History plays a big part in schools, but I still say you don't have to learn another language to appreciate your heritage and history. To do that you would have to learn an awful lot of languages and learn different dialects, if you really want to embrace your past.

gleeber
02-Sep-15, 18:54
Just to say, that's where History plays a big part in schools, but I still say you don't have to learn another language to appreciate your heritage and history. To do that you would have to learn an awful lot of languages and learn different dialects, if you really want to embrace your past.
:roll:

Have you had a wee look at the Gaelic Language Act 2005?
Note the bit where it says Gaelic shall become an official language of Scotland and shall command equal respect to English.
Would you agree that gives the Gaelic language a certain authority in Scotland?
That Act of Parliament was passed by a Scottish unionist government long before the SNP challenged the cultural identities of the British Nationalists in our midst.
Do you agree with Mr Together that anyone who thinks the Gaelic language Act is a good idea are numpties with a petty ideology?
The Gaelic language act has nothing to do with the SNP it's about Scotland.
There are still large pockets of native Gaelic speakers in Scotland. Many of the older ones were punished for talking their native language. They had to speak in whispers to avoid persecution. The Gaelic language act's about servicing an injustice.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 19:18
:roll:

Have you had a wee look at the Gaelic Language Act 2005?

No I haven't.


Note the bit where it says Gaelic shall become an official language of Scotland and shall command equal respect to English.
Would you agree that gives the Gaelic language a certain authority in Scotland?

Not enough to be forced on anybody.


That Act of Parliament was passed by a Scottish unionist government long before the SNP challenged the cultural identities of the British Nationalists in our midst.
Do you agree with Mr Together that anyone who thinks the Gaelic language Act is a good idea are numpties with a petty ideology?

I don't call anybody names.


The Gaelic language act has nothing to do with the SNP it's about Scotland.
There are still large pockets of native Gaelic speakers in Scotland. Many of the older ones were punished for talking their native language. They had to speak in whispers to avoid persecution. The Gaelic language act's about servicing an injustice.

If it was that popular and readily seen as the official language of Scotland, then it would not need an act of Parliament, it would be accepted and not forced on us. Look at what I wrote about my specific history (Angus) Where I come from we do not recognise Gaelic as the official language of Scotland.

BetterTogether
02-Sep-15, 19:33
Gaelic the official language of Scotland what absolute and utter keich !

gleeber
02-Sep-15, 19:37
Now now behave yourselves. I am quite happy to engage you as long as your respectful.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 19:42
What you have to realise Gleeber is, if you were brought up in this area, chances are your Parents or Grandparents maybe spoke Gaelic, I don't know but you probably knew or know people that spoke or still speak Gaelic. I am 52, and I have never come across anybody that speaks Gaelic, and that includes since I moved to this area six years ago, now, in this area maybe they can but just don't. Again if you were born and brought up in this area, you are deemed a Highlander, I am deemed a Lowlander and there is a world of difference between the two.

gleeber
02-Sep-15, 19:56
What you have to realise Gleeber is, if you were brought up in this area, chances are your Parents or Grandparents maybe spoke Gaelic, I don't know but you probably knew or know people that spoke or still speak Gaelic. I am 52, and I have never come across anybody that speaks Gaelic, and that includes since I moved to this area six years ago, now, in this area maybe they can but just don't. Again if you were born and brought up in this area, you are deemed a Highlander, I am deemed a Lowlander and there is a world of difference between the two.

I'm not a highlander I'm a Gleeber. [lol]

I think the lack of knowledge shown on here about Gaelic and it's place in a modern Scotland is a symptom of the age we live in.
We've had this debate often on the org and I've learnt a lot from it. Maybe you
should read the Gaelic Act and get back to me.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 19:58
I had a look at this 2005 act, this is a paragraph from Wikipedia -

"Scottish Gaelic is not an official language of the European Union or the United Kingdom. However, it is classed as an Indigenous Language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Charter_for_Regional_or_Minority_Language s), which the British government (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_the_United_Kingdom) has ratified,[/URL] and the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic#cite_note-5) established a language development body, Brd na Gidhlig (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%B2rd_na_G%C3%A0idhlig), "with a view to securing the status of the Gaelic language as an official language of Scotland."

[URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic#cite_note-6"]Now, I'm no expert but "with a view to securing the status" suggests to me Gaelic is not the official language of Scotland. I don't know what they have to do to secure the status mind you, maybe another act of Parliament.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 20:02
I'm not a highlander I'm a Gleeber. [lol]

I think the lack of knowledge shown on here about Gaelic and it's place in a modern Scotland is a symptom of the age we live in.
We've had this debate often on the org and I've learnt a lot from it. Maybe you
should read the Gaelic Act and get back to me.

I have no idea what a Gleeber is, I don't do slang I'm afraid.

Probably there is a reason for a lack of knowledge about Gaelic, there is very little interest in it. Hence the need for the Gaelic Act.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 20:04
Maybe you should read the Gaelic Act and get back to me.

I got back to you.

gleeber
02-Sep-15, 20:10
You still haven't read the Gaelic act. You'll find it on the Scottish government website.

cptdodger
02-Sep-15, 20:20
You still haven't read the Gaelic act. You'll find it on the Scottish government website.

It says pretty much the same as Wikipedia, I honestly don't know what you want me to say. I do not know what point you are trying to make.